Spice up your sources! College-wide access to JSTOR and Connell Guides now available

We have a reJSTOR buttonally exciting addition to our extensive e-library resources for the pupils and staff to access for research and school work. We now have whole school access to JSTOR’s impressive  academic journal databases. JSTOR is a digital library including more than 2,000 academic journals (50 million pages have been digitized with around 3 million added each year). It is an excellent resource, particularly for the 5th and 6th form and particularly strong in the fields of English, Classics and History. It is used comprehensively by university students and becoming familiar with it in College is good preparation for higher education and for developing independent study skills.  All our pupils can use it without the need to login, from any computer on the college network. Instructions are given on the e-library page of the Intranet for accessing it remotely. The librarians are very happy to help with any questions about this.

4th form – give it a try for your IGCSE English projects as you are currently gathering reliable and varied sources for your articles.connell guides2

We have also recently subscribed to Connell Guides. These are attractive, well-written pocket guides to English Literature. They cover a number of the texts taught in English such as The Great Gatsby, Othello, T.S Elliot’s Wasteland and many other classic novels, plays and poetry. The online content (available via the e-library) consists of a monthly quiz, fortnightly essays and monthly reviews. The content is informative and engaging, written by experts in the field of literature.

6th Form Research and Referencing advice

As the L6 IB students embark on their Extended Essays here’s some advice and information which we hope will be useful for all 6th formers, both A level and IB. How much do you know about the EE requirements? Try this quick Extended Essay quiz devised by Sarah Pavey, the Librarian at Boxhill School.

Research

  • Check the catalogue See what books are available in College.
  • Ask the librarians! We are here to help and can get articles and books from other libraries (e.g. British Library and London Library)
  • Use the e-library We subscribe to a large number of online resources. Try Questia as a starting point for e-books and articles on any subject and including international coverage.
  • NewsBank – For local and national newspaper articles indexed up to yesterday and going back to the 1980’s.
  • Google Scholar Get to the heart of the good stuff on Google. Find scholarly or academic articles, research and reports on Google Scholar. If it doesn’t give you full-text access, it is likely that we can track these down for you.
  • Make a note of the details of the sources you use as you go along, this makes it much easier to compile the Bibliography at the end.
  • More information about other online sources on the e-library here
  • Think about the keywords you are using to search for your subject – make a list of alternative words and synonyms to broaden and narrow your search results.
  • Read this excellent booklet: Using Sources – A Guide for Students: Find it – Check it – Credit it
  • For study tips – note-taking, organising your time etc See the Revision and Research Help page on this blog

More web sources:

Subject Portals Pinakes is a website hosted by Heriot Watt University. It provides a “Subject Launchpad”. Portals bring the best websites and collections of documents together in one place. Particularly useful and famous ones are:

  • Bized (for Business Studies and Economics)
  • Sci Central Gateway to the best Science News sources
  • Sapling  Architecture, Planning and Lanscape information gateway.
  • Physics World – News, views and information for the global physics community from the Institute of Physics
  • Philosophy around the Web Don’t be put off by the amateurish look of this website.The main purpose of this site is to act as a guide and a gateway to philosophy resources on the Internet.
  • PubMed Central PMC is a free full-text archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature at the U.S. National Institutes of Health’s National Library of Medicine (NIH/NLM).

 

Avoiding Plagiarism

My favourite anti-plagiarism video comes from Bergen University Library. It’s based on Charles Dickens ‘Christmas Carol’ and is very funny.

Using images

Be sure to credit images you use. Here’s a useful website ‘5 good places for students to find public domain images‘ (these are images you can use to illustrate your work but you still need to cite the copyright holder)

Wikimedia Commons

This is an excellent initiative by the creators of wikipedia. People have donated their photos to be freely used by others. This is an excellent source of copyright free images.

 

Referencing

  • For more advice and information on Referencing and compiling your Bibliography see the Referencing & Research page of the intranet
  • Always list all your sources in your Bibliography (include people you interviewed, Tweets, Podcasts, TV documentaries, online sources and websites as well as the more obvious books, articles and newspapers)
  • Always state the date you accessed a website
  • To generate bibliographic references very easily try Cite This For Me
  • Be consistent – choose one style of referencing and stick to it. Harvard is a good one to adopt.

3rd Form English Projects

We look forward to seeing more 3rd form pupils in the Library researching their English projects. Here is a recap of some of the resources we offer. Please ask the Librarians if you need help.

  • iPads – we have 12 iPads you can use for researching in the Library. (there are fantastic new apps on London – A City through Time, Leonardo da Vinci, Evolution from the Natural History Museum, Prof Brian Cox’s Wonders of the Universe, Titanic, T.S. Eliot’s Wasteland, Shakespeare’s Sonnets and many more)
  • Newspapers – daily  print broadsheets: The Times, Telegraph, i and The Guardian.
  • Magazines and journals – paper copies of sports, general interest, news and current affairs and subject specific titles.(including New Scientist, The Economist, BBC Music, BBC Focus, National Geographic, Cosmos, New Statesman and The Spectator)
  • E-Library – Don’t forget to look at NewsBank (for newspaper articles from as recently as yesterday and going back many years). The Day is an online newspaper with 3 stories written for schools everyday it offers useful additional links and is searchable by subject too. We have the electronic version of “The Week” which is an excellent resource and the whole archive is subject searchable.
  • Need a dictionary? Access the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) online
  • The Spiritual Room (also known as the Auchinleck Room) houses the bulk of the non-fiction bookstock. Access the catalogue from the e-library to see what resources are available in the Library and the departmental libraries.
  • Issues and Fact File 2013 are available in the Spiritual Room. These are printed pamphlets on a wide range of topical issues (eg. drugs in sport, poverty, war, religion, abortion, environmental issues, health)
  • Issues Today Online – this is a great resource for topical and controversial issues – similar to the above but in electronic format.

 

 

 

 

Another tip – learn how to mobile print – once you’ve found out your pin number and printed a couple of times it is very quick and easy. You will be able to print from your mobile phones and laptops and collect the print from printers around college. Detailed instructions here.

 

 

 

Study Skills – Advice and Information for 6th formers

University of Sussex Study Skills – This is an excellent website from the University of Sussex. Designed for University students it contains really useful advice for 6th formers.

It is clearly laid out with many useful sections covering:

More Study Skills Advice from Manchester University and Leeds University

University of Southampton Academic Skills This website has some incredibly informative and useful in depth guides to study skills.