Y9 Mini Literature Festival Friday 4th March

VMMSedgwick

 

 

 

 

 

 

Y9 enjoyed a continuation of the celebrations of books and reading the day after World Book Day with a morning of author talks. We were excited to welcome one of own authors – Virginia Macgregor, twice published author and English teacher here at Wellington. Virginia talked about the inspiration for her novels and read an excerpt from “The astonishing return of Norah Wells”. The students were full of questions and a number of them felt inspired to continue with their own creative writing projects including writing their own novels.

After break we welcomed award-winning young adult author Marcus Sedgwick to the theatre. Y9 were all given a copy of ‘Revolver’ by Marcus to read over the summer before their arrival at Wellington. His books have proved popular with a large number of our students, in particular ‘My Swordhand is singing’ and many of the students have read his Carnegie-shortlisted novel ‘Midwinterblood’. He opened his talk with a debate about the pros and cons of being a writer. He talked about his interest in coincidence and how it became a major theme in ‘She is not invisible’. How many hidden references to the number 354 can you find in the book?

The strong message that came across from both authors was that writing is something they love and can’t do without. They urged the young people to do something they really enjoy with their lives and then it doesn’t feel like work!

World Book Day – 3rd March 2016 – Drop Everything and Read!

World Book Day 3rd March

Next week is a celebratory time for books and reading. Thursday 3rd March is World Book Day and to demonstrate our commitment to reading across the whole school we are running a D.E.A.R. – Drop Everything and Read event. Where possible we are hoping that all staff, including non-teaching staff, and students will stop what they are doing and read a book for sheer enjoyment at the start of lesson 3 on Thursday. So this will be 20 minutes of engrossed silence from 11.15am! All staff and students are welcome to come to the Library at break to stock up on refreshments and choose books or magazines to read. It is wonderful to see people of all ages enjoying reading and provides an opportunity to share favourites and make reading recommendations. For exam sets, teachers may provide subject specific articles or chapters of books for the whole group to read and discuss afterwards – an opportunity for students to be inspired and challenged in a more curriculum-related way. We have The New Scientist Archive Online as well as The Economist, New York Times, History Today, Philosophy Now and Cambridge Companions Online to name but a selection of our electronic resources which enable whole classes to read the same material simultaneously.

Parents, why not talk to your children about what they are reading at the moment and share your favourites with them? If you are looking for suggestions for Y9 –Y11 the Carnegie Book Award longlist has just been announced and includes some impressive contemporary fiction (many of which we have in the Library)

On Friday 4th March the Y9 are in for a literary treat. They are hearing two author talks in the theatre. Wellington English teacher, Virginia Macgregor has recently had her second novel published – The astonishing return of Norah Wells and will be talking to the students about her inspiration for her books and her writing process. Award-winning young adult novelist, Marcus Sedgwick will also be joining us and discussing his books and writing. Y9 read his novel ‘Revolver’ in the summer prior to arriving at Wellington. There will be plenty of opportunity for the students to ask questions.

Happy reading!

‘The Lie Tree’ by Frances Hardinge wins the Costa Book Award 2015

Ms Dahlke writes: 

Congratulations to Frances Hardinge for winning the Costa Book of the Year award for her young adult novel, The Lie Tree. Despite the award being established in 1971, this is only the second time a book for young people has won it. I’m not surprised that it won the overall award, I read it over the summer holidays and have been recommending it to people (of all ages) ever since.

The book is set in Victorian times and begins with Faith, a teenage girl, and her family arriving on an island in order to escape the scandal that engulfed them in London. What was the scandal? And why is her natural scientist father so reluctant to talk about it? Faith is determined to find out.

This book has an original and tightly structured plot, which keeps the suspense going until the very end. Faith – stubborn and spiky, but with a sense of honour that wins out in the end – is a great character. It’s an entertaining read that will also raise questions about the nature of truth and lies. 

I would agree that this is a unique and fascinating novel, appealing to all ages. More information is available in an interesting article from Telegraph books

 

Service Team – Book List

The Service Team at Wellington College suggested a book list on the theme of social issues. This is a starting point – most of the following books are available from the Library; we will be adding books to this list. I personally would highly recommend Tuesdays with Morrie as a remarkable and uplifting book dealing with terminal illness and dying but also with many positive messages for all of us. Matt Haig’s autobiographical book ‘Reasons to stay alive’ deals with depression in a very honest way but has some helpful suggestions for dealing with the illness which still challenges him.

A selection of mainly autobiographical books giving some insight into a range of social issues.

  • Depression, Mental health issues
    • Black rainbow – Rachel Kelly
    • Reasons to stay alive – Matt Haig
    • The shock of the fall – Nathan Filer (fiction)
    • It’s kind of a funny story – Ned Vizzini
  • Dementia, Aging
    • Elizabeth is missing – Emma Healey (fiction)
  • Homelessness, Addiction
    • A street cat named Bob – James Bowen
  • Poverty, Child neglect
    • Ugly – Constance Briscoe
    • The Kid – Kevin Lewis
    • Hidden – Cathy Glass
  • Life lessons
    • Tuesdays with Morrie – Mitch Albom

Christmas reading and puzzles 2015

Helen Smith, the librarian at Eckington School has kindly shared her library Christmas Reading Times with us again this year. This is a marvellous publication listing all the Christmas TV based on books. She also reminds us not to miss the Royal Institution Christmas Lectures at 8pm on BBC 4 on Monday 28th, Tuesday 29th and Wednesday 30th December. This year the theme is survival in space and the lectures are presented by Kevin Fong.

Don’t miss the Royal Institution’s space themed online Advent Calendar – A Place called Space  – it includes animations, infographics and archive footage of early space exploration missions. It’s already proving popular with Physics teachers and I’m looking forward to seeing what the rest of December brings us.

On the subject of advent calendars have a look at the Book Trust advent calendar 2015 for 24 favourite children’s books. For Maths challenges try the NRICH advent calendar There’s a primary one here for younger children.

For a truly testing brainteaser this Christmas holiday try the GCHQ Christmas puzzle This has been entertaining and infuriating many of our teachers and students over the past few days.

For news junkies you can test your knowledge of the year’s key stories with The Day’s News Mega Quiz

The Y9s have been encouraged to read the same book as the rest of their tutor group and come back and discuss it in January. Here is the list of suggested reads they chose from – 3rd form Christmas books 2015

 

 

 

 

Space advent calendar, world’s lightest metal and Syria’s rappers in the News Digest this week

This week’s News Digest is now available: News Digest 27th November – 3rd December 2015

Extend your subject knowledge, ace your University interviews, impress Dr Gardner during debating, talk knowledgeably to your peers and colleagues! All the key news stories you might have missed this week brought to you from a range of reputable sources by the Wellington College Library Team.

My favourite this week is the Royal Institution’s space themed online Advent Calendar – A Place called Space  – it includes animations, infographics and archive footage of early space exploration missions. It’s already proving popular with Physics teachers and I’m looking forward to seeing what the rest of December brings us.

For news junkies you can test your knowledge of the year’s key stories with The Day’s News Mega Quiz

(A number of the links are from our News Bank database and therefore only available to Wellington College pupils and staff)

 

Astronauts, algebra, smarter siblings and quiet entrepreneurs in the Library News Digest this week

Weekly News Digest brought to your inbox every Friday by the Library Team

Here is the latest News Digest – covering stories published from Friday 6th – Thursday 12th November.

This is primarily intended for staff and students at Wellington College, (as an educational and current awareness bulletin) so a number of links to stories on our databases will not be available to the general public.

 Last week’s most popular story was Could humans swim quicker by imitating eels and jellyfish?

What will you read this week?

  • Want to be up to date with current affairs?
  • Like to be more knowledgeable about developments in your favourite subjects?
  • Need to know the latest hot topics in Law, Medicine, History, Science, Art etc for University interviews?
  • Debaters – want to sharpen up your knowledge of topical issues?

Then don’t ignore the Library News Digest!

Look out for this weekly email every Friday.  The News Digest is created for you by the Library Team to save you time and bring together the most interesting and useful news stories of the week. We look through the main broadsheets for interesting news stories along with the BBC News website, JSTOR Weekly Digest, The Conversation and a range of other authoritative new sources.

You can use the subject area navigation menus at the top to just dip into your favourite subjects.

Let us know what you think by emailing feedback to the Library email.

 

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