3rd Form reading kicks off in the library with the Picton boys

This morning we welcomed the Picton 3rd form tutor group to the library for an informal discussion about the book “In the Sea there are Crocodiles”. Each year the librarians agonise over the choice of book to send to all new 3rd form pupils. We search for a book to suit both boys and girls, something readable and interesting as well as thought-provoking and memorable. We have  a lot of reading  to get through to find something we are happy with. Last year’s book ‘Trash’ proved very popular with its incredible plot and fast pace. This year’s book may have been a slow starter but it rapidly became an involving and inspiring story.3rd form reading Pn

‘In the Sea there are Crocodiles’ is the account of Enaiatollah’s life from the age of 10 to 15. It is based on his recollections of the perilous journey he made from his home in Afghanistan all the way to Italy as a child and teenager without any family support. He is amazingly resilient and recounts his life story to Fabio Geda, the Italian author who wrote the book.in-the-sea-there-are-crocodiles

Here are some of the 3rd form comments on the book:

“Exhilarating, tense, funny and moving”

“I loved the calmness of the book and the good moments I enjoyed”

“…extremely inspirational and it really made me think about the world”

“….very interesting and enjoyable. My Mum read it too!”

“I loved the book. It has opened my mind. It has made me more aware of how tough and how unfair people’s lives can be and makes me feel very privileged.”

….very moving and a good demonstration of what the world is like in some places”

We are looking forward to more book chat sessions with other tutor groups in the coming weeks.

3rd Form English Projects

We look forward to seeing more 3rd form pupils in the Library researching their English projects. Here is a recap of some of the resources we offer. Please ask the Librarians if you need help.

  • iPads – we have 12 iPads you can use for researching in the Library. (there are fantastic new apps on London – A City through Time, Leonardo da Vinci, Evolution from the Natural History Museum, Prof Brian Cox’s Wonders of the Universe, Titanic, T.S. Eliot’s Wasteland, Shakespeare’s Sonnets and many more)
  • Newspapers – daily  print broadsheets: The Times, Telegraph, i and The Guardian.
  • Magazines and journals – paper copies of sports, general interest, news and current affairs and subject specific titles.(including New Scientist, The Economist, BBC Music, BBC Focus, National Geographic, Cosmos, New Statesman and The Spectator)
  • E-Library – Don’t forget to look at NewsBank (for newspaper articles from as recently as yesterday and going back many years). The Day is an online newspaper with 3 stories written for schools everyday it offers useful additional links and is searchable by subject too. We have the electronic version of “The Week” which is an excellent resource and the whole archive is subject searchable.
  • Need a dictionary? Access the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) online
  • The Spiritual Room (also known as the Auchinleck Room) houses the bulk of the non-fiction bookstock. Access the catalogue from the e-library to see what resources are available in the Library and the departmental libraries.
  • Issues and Fact File 2013 are available in the Spiritual Room. These are printed pamphlets on a wide range of topical issues (eg. drugs in sport, poverty, war, religion, abortion, environmental issues, health)
  • Issues Today Online – this is a great resource for topical and controversial issues – similar to the above but in electronic format.

 

 

 

 

Another tip – learn how to mobile print – once you’ve found out your pin number and printed a couple of times it is very quick and easy. You will be able to print from your mobile phones and laptops and collect the print from printers around college. Detailed instructions here.

 

 

 

Researching House History in the Library

This morning Dr Dunn’s 3rd form History class spent a productive lesson researching the History of their boarding houses. They used the big screens and iPads to search the online Dictionary of National Biography and scoured the historical book stock for references to Picton and Hill, Murray and Orange etc. See the photos in the post below.

Did you know that apparently Wellington called Picton:

“a rough, foul-mouthed devil as ever lived”

Griffiths, Arthur. Wellington his comrades and contemporaries.(George Allen, 1897), p319